Author Topic: NHS winter issues  (Read 1084 times)

Hope

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NHS winter issues
« on: December 15, 2015, 08:41:21 AM »
With temperatures tonight expected to be similar to average July night temperatures (possibly even higher than some we had earlier this year), what issues does this promise for the NHS in people's views?  Fewer broken bones from slippage on ice, and instances of hypothermia; higher numbers of flood-related disease and accidents?  With the prevalence of central heating, does the traditional belief that cold weather helps control the number of bugs and viruses still hold?
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Trentvoyager

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Re: NHS winter issues
« Reply #1 on: December 15, 2015, 08:54:03 AM »
No idea Hope. All I can tell you is from direct knowledge is that A & E (or ED as they now call it) in our area is struggling even with the benefit of milder temperatures.

I dread to think what it will be like when the cold weather does hit.
the more I hear & see of Boris Johnson & Jacob Rees Mogg, the more I am convinced that Eton should be in Special Measures.

Floo

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Re: NHS winter issues
« Reply #2 on: December 17, 2015, 11:32:06 AM »
They used to say, 'a mild winter, a full churchyard!'
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Jack Knave

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Re: NHS winter issues
« Reply #3 on: December 17, 2015, 01:52:28 PM »
As Trent said I hear the NHS is near breaking point now let alone if a heavy winter hits us. Some NHS Trusts are having to borrow to pay their staff, that's a sure sign that funding is very tight and things are on the edge.

Hope

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Re: NHS winter issues
« Reply #4 on: December 17, 2015, 03:13:23 PM »
As Trent said I hear the NHS is near breaking point now let alone if a heavy winter hits us. Some NHS Trusts are having to borrow to pay their staff, that's a sure sign that funding is very tight and things are on the edge.
I was just wondering what the added burdens might be as a result of the mild weather, as opposed to those associated with a heavy winter.
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Trentvoyager

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Re: NHS winter issues
« Reply #5 on: December 17, 2015, 03:20:17 PM »
I was just wondering what the added burdens might be as a result of the mild weather, as opposed to those associated with a heavy winter.

i'm really not sure Hope.

All I know is that our hospital at the moment is akin to when you used to build dams on the beach at the seaside - where you'd block up a little stream from a pool only to have that outflanked, so you'd buuild a smaller dam to contain that - and that gets outflanked, so you build another dam and that gets outflanked - and then you turn around and look at the original dam you built and it has completely washed away.

That's what it feels like in ED (A & E)
the more I hear & see of Boris Johnson & Jacob Rees Mogg, the more I am convinced that Eton should be in Special Measures.

Rhiannon

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Re: NHS winter issues
« Reply #6 on: December 17, 2015, 03:22:52 PM »
I agree pretty much with Trent. My local hospital is Addenbrookes and it's ended up in special measures. It's unbelievable.

Hope

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Re: NHS winter issues
« Reply #7 on: December 17, 2015, 03:36:48 PM »
I agree pretty much with Trent. My local hospital is Addenbrookes and it's ended up in special measures. It's unbelievable.
I thought 'special measures' had to do with poor management, Rhi. 
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Rhiannon

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Re: NHS winter issues
« Reply #8 on: December 17, 2015, 03:54:50 PM »
I thought 'special measures' had to do with poor management, Rhi.

It's more complex than that. But I'm reluctant to look on the bright side of the possibility of a milder winter meaning fewer excess deaths (charming phrase, that).

Jack Knave

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Re: NHS winter issues
« Reply #9 on: December 18, 2015, 11:53:58 AM »
I was just wondering what the added burdens might be as a result of the mild weather, as opposed to those associated with a heavy winter.
Mosquito bites?  ;D

In that case I don't think the weather is the issue here. It could be some illness - some colds or flus seem to flourish when it is chilly but not wintery...? Otherwise I don't really know.

Brownie

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Re: NHS winter issues
« Reply #10 on: December 22, 2015, 12:44:58 PM »
The NHS will cope very well indeed, there will be the odd horror story on the news but I doubt any of us will know anyone severely affected by the cold.   Extreme cold does lower resistance to some germs but it also kills off some so the important thing is to nourish ourselves and keep warm indoors, wrap up well if we go out.  A bit of fresh air does us all good.  Says me who has very little.

We don't live in the dark ages, most of us have central heating and hot water.  The government pays pensioners a hundred pounds each towards fuel bills which is a decent amount.

I can remember being much colder when I was young and having various infections.  Things are better now.  Out NHS is marvellous.
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Sassy

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Re: NHS winter issues
« Reply #11 on: December 27, 2015, 10:49:49 AM »
A lot more people will die because of the number of hospitals closed and the accident departments of the hospitals.
When someone has a half hour drive to a hospital at normal speed it lowers the chances of survival.

A&E is now just the Emergency Department which is very American.
They have closed hospitals A&E making it that more people will die from not being treated soon enough.
And the cold weather or warm weather does not affect those emergencies.

Sad isn't it.
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Brownie

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Re: NHS winter issues
« Reply #12 on: December 27, 2015, 08:06:03 PM »
Yes it is sad.  I suppose we are fortunate in the Greater London area when it comes to A& E, there's a good one not far from us, there's also another general hospital (no A&E there but they have a walk in GP clinic) - we even have a local community hospital not far away though I am not quite sure what it does, I intend to google it.

There are things about the winter which worry me, bad 'flu epidemics, winter vomiting disease etc.  Not much you can do about those either except keep fluid levels up, temperature down and stay in the warm.  Of course these things will be more dangerous for the elderly who may be frail in some hitherto undetected way, and for people with other health problems.
Still I think the NHS does very well in the UK, we shouldn't moan too much.
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