Author Topic: Archaeologists Discover Remains of Egyptian Army From the Biblical Exodus in Red  (Read 37008 times)

jeremyp

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Low numbers fits with no archaeological findings. However, the four-generation genealogy from Levi to Moses is in the same book, Exodus, as the estimated number of 600,000. So they are clearly serious about both.

Are you claiming the 600,000 figure is accurate?

A group that size could not possibly move about without leaving archaeological evidence. For example, assume everybody lived to be exactly 70 years of age (three score years and ten). That would mean twenty three people dying every day. Where are the bodies?
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Anchorman

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In case you were under the impression that the Sinai desert was some vast unpopulated no mans land, Spud, just ripe for a vast nomadic tribe to camp in, then think again. From before the Pyramid age, trade routes were common in the area,. By the Middle Kingdom -c2100-1900, Egypt already had trading colonies at Byblos, reached by guarded trade routes. By the Nwe Kingdom, Egypt ruled the area right up to, and including, bits of what is now Turkey. A well policed series of military outposts and forts built by the likes of Amenhotep II, Thutmose III, Sety I, Ramesses II,even Shoshenq I, are well attested. Here's a site linking to Chicago uni excavations in the area. It's out of date, though, as a massive fortress complex was discovered only last year, with evidence of occupation from Thutmose III untill Ramesses VI -three centuries and more, covering the time when Exodus is set. https://www.jstor.org/stable/25066962?sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjnvISGiJjnAhWDtXEKHXFXCWc4ChAWMAF6BAgJEAE&seq=1
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Harrowby Hall

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Are you claiming the 600,000 figure is accurate?

 Where are the bodies?

And where is th coprolite?
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jeremyp

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And where is th coprolite?

Even worse. That 600,000 discounts the children and livestock and other hangers on.We must be talking about more than  million individuals living things.

And yet there is no trace of them.
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Spud

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In case you were under the impression that the Sinai desert was some vast unpopulated no mans land, Spud, just ripe for a vast nomadic tribe to camp in, then think again. From before the Pyramid age, trade routes were common in the area,. By the Middle Kingdom -c2100-1900, Egypt already had trading colonies at Byblos, reached by guarded trade routes. By the Nwe Kingdom, Egypt ruled the area right up to, and including, bits of what is now Turkey. A well policed series of military outposts and forts built by the likes of Amenhotep II, Thutmose III, Sety I, Ramesses II,even Shoshenq I, are well attested. Here's a site linking to Chicago uni excavations in the area. It's out of date, though, as a massive fortress complex was discovered only last year, with evidence of occupation from Thutmose III untill Ramesses VI -three centuries and more, covering the time when Exodus is set. https://www.jstor.org/stable/25066962?sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjnvISGiJjnAhWDtXEKHXFXCWc4ChAWMAF6BAgJEAE&seq=1

The Hyksos dynasty might have been a period when Egyptian hegemony over Canaan would have lapsed, making it theoretically possible for Israel to invade. Wasn't the Exodus traditionally associated with the Hyksos (Josephus etc)?

Anchorman

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The Hyksos dynasty might have been a period when Egyptian hegemony over Canaan would have lapsed, making it theoretically possible for Israel to invade. Wasn't the Exodus traditionally associated with the Hyksos (Josephus etc)?
If you trawl through this thread, you'll note that: 1) the Hyksos never ruled the whole of Egypt, therefotre there was no vizierate of the whole of Egypt for Joseph to occupy. 2) Even the bit of Egypt the Hyksos controlled was not unified. Two, three - even at one point four kinglets ruling parts of Lower Egypt simultaneously...we found a whole 'dynasty' ruling from Abydos, calling themselves 'Lord of the Two lands' but who were less than local chieftains at best. Evejn the areas controlled by the Hyksos were never totally secure, and relied on importing goods from the Levant and trade with the princelings who would later form the Theban Kingdom which would expel the Hyksos. The seventy or so years whehn the Hyksos actually ruled were known for erratic Nile flooding - too low or too high, never really stable, meaning that the storehouses - in the temples - which held the grain for emergencies - were certainly never in a position to export to other area, nor dole out supplies to needy petitioners. Famine in Egypt is well known; surfiet is not. Whenever the Exodus happenhed, you can rule out the 'hyksos period straight away. Besides this, given their religious practices - a syncretism between imported Canaanite deities such as Reshep, Astarte, Ball, etc, and the Eastern desert Egyptian deity St, the las thing the Hyksos would tolerate would have been some monotheists.
« Last Edit: January 27, 2020, 05:49:11 PM by Anchorman »
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Anchorman

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 An anchor...well, my username IS 'Anchorman'. This looks to me to date to around the reigns of Thutmose II, Hatshepsut or Thutmose III, in the early to mid Eighteenth dynasty. I'm comparing it with similar examples from the British Museum and the Louvre. It shows the expansionist policy of the eighteenth dynasty kings AS THEY CREATED AN Empire in the Turkey/Syria/Palestine area. It also indicates the Egyptian hegemony over what is now Israel around 1550 BC; showing that no distinctive non-Egyptianised culture would be allowed to thrive under the Thutmosid dynasty. https://khentiamentiu.blogspot.com/2020/02/mysterious-egyptian-artifact-from.html?spref=fb&fbclid=IwAR1DUYVyHkCiY8GzlVvH82lZcSx-qx8wpTG4a-QilpfIfgzly_ehGqL6G9g
"The rose of all the world is not for me.
I want, for my part only the little white rose of Scotland,
that smells sharp and sweet and breaks the heart."